Chicago Activists Fight Against Slavery In Mauritania

Abolition Institute co-founder Sean Tenner traveling with SOS Esclaves founder Boubacar Messaoud in rural Mauritania.
Abolition Institute co-founder Sean Tenner traveling with SOS Esclaves founder Boubacar Messaoud in rural Mauritania. Courtesy of Abolition Institute
Abolition Institute co-founder Sean Tenner traveling with SOS Esclaves founder Boubacar Messaoud in rural Mauritania.
Abolition Institute co-founder Sean Tenner traveling with SOS Esclaves founder Boubacar Messaoud in rural Mauritania. Courtesy of Abolition Institute

Chicago Activists Fight Against Slavery In Mauritania

It took Mauritania until 1981 to abolish slavery, and even then, the act did not become a crime until 2007. Only two cases have been taken to court in the nine years since.

This racial and societal divide in the African nation means abolitionist groups are fighting an uphill battle toward progress. We talk to Sean Tenner, co-founder of the Chicago based Abolition Institute, about what is being done to stop slavery and with Mohamed Barro, a Mauritanian who can speak first-hand to the situation in his country.