Colombian Peace Deal in Jeopardy as FARC Rearms

In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama’s special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities “the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again.“
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama's special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities "the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again." AP Photo
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama’s special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities “the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again.“
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama's special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities "the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again." AP Photo

Colombian Peace Deal in Jeopardy as FARC Rearms

A peace deal signed in 2016 that, in theory, ended 50 years of civil war in Colombia is now in jeopardy as leftist rebel group the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) accuses the Colombian government of breaking its terms and announces plans to rearm. With us to discuss the peace deal is one of its negotiators, longtime Worldview human rights contributor and Professor Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame Law School Doug Cassel. Doug also recaps the highlights of his appearances on Worldview over the past 25 years, including a debate with John Yoo. Yoo was a legal adviser to the Bush Administration who drafted the 2002 Department of Justice “Torture Memos,” which made the legal case for the CIA’s use of enhanced interrogation techniques such as waterboarding.