Detention, Asylum and Capital Punishment: An Update on Human Rights in East Asia

Pan Ei Mon, center, wife of Reuters journalist Wa Lone, walks along with Chit Su Win, left, wife of Reuters journalist Kyaw Soe Oo, as they leave the High Court in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. A court in Myanmar on Friday rejected the appeal of two Reuters journalists convicted of violating the country’s Official Secrets Act during their reporting on the country’s crackdown on Rohingya Muslims, and maintained the seven-year prison terms they were sentenced to last year. (AP Photo/Thein Zaw)
Pan Ei Mon, center, wife of Reuters journalist Wa Lone, walks along with Chit Su Win, left, wife of Reuters journalist Kyaw Soe Oo, as they leave the High Court in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. A court in Myanmar on Friday rejected the appeal of two Reuters journalists convicted of violating the country's Official Secrets Act during their reporting on the country's crackdown on Rohingya Muslims, and maintained the seven-year prison terms they were sentenced to last year. Thein Zaw / AP Photo
Pan Ei Mon, center, wife of Reuters journalist Wa Lone, walks along with Chit Su Win, left, wife of Reuters journalist Kyaw Soe Oo, as they leave the High Court in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. A court in Myanmar on Friday rejected the appeal of two Reuters journalists convicted of violating the country’s Official Secrets Act during their reporting on the country’s crackdown on Rohingya Muslims, and maintained the seven-year prison terms they were sentenced to last year. (AP Photo/Thein Zaw)
Pan Ei Mon, center, wife of Reuters journalist Wa Lone, walks along with Chit Su Win, left, wife of Reuters journalist Kyaw Soe Oo, as they leave the High Court in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. A court in Myanmar on Friday rejected the appeal of two Reuters journalists convicted of violating the country's Official Secrets Act during their reporting on the country's crackdown on Rohingya Muslims, and maintained the seven-year prison terms they were sentenced to last year. Thein Zaw / AP Photo

Detention, Asylum and Capital Punishment: An Update on Human Rights in East Asia

Some of the world’s greatest crises have reached East Asia. Asylum seekers like Rahaf Mohammed, a Saudi teenager, and Hakeem al-Araibi, a Bahraini footballer, have been detained and threatened with deportation in Thailand. Both claimed credible fear to return to their home countries. Mohammed was detained on a layover to Australia where she’d hoped to seek asylum. She was just granted in Canada after that country intervened. Al-Araibi, a permanent citizen of Australia, was arrested while on vacation in Thailand by request of the Bahraini authorities for his anti-government activism. Meanwhile, China’s tensions with Canada have exacerbated when a court in Dalian sentenced a Canadian citizen to death for trying to smuggle methamphetamines through China to Australia. Some have argued that the death sentence was passed down in retaliation for Canada arresting a Chinese tech executive for her role in stealing intellectual property. We’ll talk about all of these unfolding cases with Phil Robertson, Asia division deputy director for Human Rights Watch.