EcoMyths: Saving The Florida Everglades

In this image made from video, the sun sets near an industrial park next to the Florida Everglades, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016, in Miami. Years before his Republican presidential bid, Marco Rubio pushed Miami-Dade County officials to allow a major industrial development to be built on restricted land near the Florida Everglades. That was two months after he backed a law as a member of the Florida Legislature that made it harder for people to challenge the kinds of developments he advocated for as a private attorney.
In this image made from video, the sun sets near an industrial park next to the Florida Everglade. Wilfredo Lee / AP Photo
In this image made from video, the sun sets near an industrial park next to the Florida Everglades, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016, in Miami. Years before his Republican presidential bid, Marco Rubio pushed Miami-Dade County officials to allow a major industrial development to be built on restricted land near the Florida Everglades. That was two months after he backed a law as a member of the Florida Legislature that made it harder for people to challenge the kinds of developments he advocated for as a private attorney.
In this image made from video, the sun sets near an industrial park next to the Florida Everglade. Wilfredo Lee / AP Photo

EcoMyths: Saving The Florida Everglades

Fertilizer pollution threatens our fresh water and in Florida, the problem is especially urgent, as it’s destroying inland and marine ecosystems, along with sources of drinking water.

For our monthly EcoMyths segment, we explore why restoring the Florida Everglades is essential for preventing catastrophic shifts in availability of fresh, clean drinking water and preventing flooding. Kate Sackman of the EcoMyths Alliance and Evelyn Gaiser, professor of biological sciences at Florida International University explain why conservation is not only vital for Florida, but for all of us.