Ethiopia Declares State Of Emergency After Prime Minister Resigns

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, during press conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Desalegn announced that he has submitted a resignation letter after the worst anti-government protests in a quarter-century, saying he hoped the surprise decision would help planned reforms succeed and create a “lasting peace.“
Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, during press conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Desalegn announced that he has submitted a resignation letter after the worst anti-government protests in a quarter-century, saying he hoped the surprise decision would help planned reforms succeed and create a "lasting peace." AP Photo
Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, during press conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Desalegn announced that he has submitted a resignation letter after the worst anti-government protests in a quarter-century, saying he hoped the surprise decision would help planned reforms succeed and create a “lasting peace.“
Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, during press conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Desalegn announced that he has submitted a resignation letter after the worst anti-government protests in a quarter-century, saying he hoped the surprise decision would help planned reforms succeed and create a "lasting peace." AP Photo

Ethiopia Declares State Of Emergency After Prime Minister Resigns

Ethiopian authorities have declared a state of emergency after Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn announced his resignation Thursday. He will still work in the caretaker government until a new one is selected. His six-year tenure was marred by violent, prolonged protests that led to the deaths of hundreds. A 10-month national state of emergency failed to quell the unrest, as did the release of some lower-level political prisoners in January.

Ethiopia is Africa’s second-most populous country and an important United States ally, and some hope Desalegn’s resignation is a step towards meaningful reform. To discuss, we’re joined by Charles Schaefer, professor of International Studies at Valparaiso University.