Film Series ‘Apocalypse Then: The Vietnam War On Film’ At Gene Siskel Film Center

Marines charge against a sniper down the trail of Phu Thu peninsula southeast of Hue in March 1966. And at left, behind a tree is a television cameraman filming the action.
Marines charge against a sniper down the trail of Phu Thu peninsula southeast of Hue in March 1966. And at left, behind a tree is a television cameraman filming the action. AP Photo/Eddie Adams
Marines charge against a sniper down the trail of Phu Thu peninsula southeast of Hue in March 1966. And at left, behind a tree is a television cameraman filming the action.
Marines charge against a sniper down the trail of Phu Thu peninsula southeast of Hue in March 1966. And at left, behind a tree is a television cameraman filming the action. AP Photo/Eddie Adams

Film Series ‘Apocalypse Then: The Vietnam War On Film’ At Gene Siskel Film Center

The recent Ken Burns series Vietnam demonstrated how Americans are still learning about a traumatic war which killed millions of people.

Nora Annesley Taylor is Alsdorf professor of South and Southeast Asian Art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and author of Painters in Hanoi: An Ethnography of Vietnamese Art. She’s curated a film series that explores the war from colonialism to post-war issues called Apocalypse Then: The Vietnam War On Film. The series runs at the Gene Siskel Film Center Jan. 27 to May 8.

WBEZ film contributor Milos Stehlik, of Facets Chicago, joins Taylor to discuss the film series and recent reexamination of the Vietnam War.