Income Inequality And The Trump Administration

In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, a screen at a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is juxtaposed with the Goldman Sachs booth. The nation’s largest investment bank is barring its top employees from contributing to certain political campaigns, including Donald Trump’s White House bid. The new rules, which went into effect last week, prohibit partners at Goldman Sachs from donating to politicians running for state or local office, or to state officials who are seeking federal office. That applies to Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Trump’s running mate, which means that the Goldman Sachs partners can’t contribute to the Republican ticket.
In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, a screen at a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is juxtaposed with the Goldman Sachs booth. The nation’s largest investment bank is barring its top employees from contributing to certain political campaigns, including Donald Trump’s White House bid. The new rules, which went into effect last week, prohibit partners at Goldman Sachs from donating to politicians running for state or local office, or to state officials who are seeking federal office. That applies to Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Trump’s running mate, which means that the Goldman Sachs partners can’t contribute to the Republican ticket. Richard Drew / AP Photo
In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, a screen at a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is juxtaposed with the Goldman Sachs booth. The nation’s largest investment bank is barring its top employees from contributing to certain political campaigns, including Donald Trump’s White House bid. The new rules, which went into effect last week, prohibit partners at Goldman Sachs from donating to politicians running for state or local office, or to state officials who are seeking federal office. That applies to Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Trump’s running mate, which means that the Goldman Sachs partners can’t contribute to the Republican ticket.
In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, a screen at a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is juxtaposed with the Goldman Sachs booth. The nation’s largest investment bank is barring its top employees from contributing to certain political campaigns, including Donald Trump’s White House bid. The new rules, which went into effect last week, prohibit partners at Goldman Sachs from donating to politicians running for state or local office, or to state officials who are seeking federal office. That applies to Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Trump’s running mate, which means that the Goldman Sachs partners can’t contribute to the Republican ticket. Richard Drew / AP Photo

Income Inequality And The Trump Administration

During his campaign, President Donald Trump promised to remember the “forgotten man,” deriding and criticizing big banks like Goldman Sachs.

But his presidency is poised benefit the “one percent” — the Trump administration has hired five former Goldman Sachs staffers. What does this mean for steadily rising income inequality in the U.S.?

We speak with Jeffery Winters, director of Northwestern University’s Equality, Development and Globalization Studies Program, to examine where the state of inequality and the kind of policies it would take to begin making a difference.