ISIS Attacks Plummet in West, but Threat Still Worries

MIDEAST SYRIA INSIDE KOBANI
In this Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 photo, a Kurdish fighter walks past the town entrance circle heading to Kurdish strongholds in Kobani, Syria. Backed by small numbers of Iraqi peshmerga forces and Free Syrian Army rebels, Kurdish fighters, whose political founders espouse a firm left-wing ideology, are locked in fierce battles to push back militants of the Islamic State group, which swept into the town in mid-September. Jake Simkin / AP Photo
MIDEAST SYRIA INSIDE KOBANI
In this Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 photo, a Kurdish fighter walks past the town entrance circle heading to Kurdish strongholds in Kobani, Syria. Backed by small numbers of Iraqi peshmerga forces and Free Syrian Army rebels, Kurdish fighters, whose political founders espouse a firm left-wing ideology, are locked in fierce battles to push back militants of the Islamic State group, which swept into the town in mid-September. Jake Simkin / AP Photo

ISIS Attacks Plummet in West, but Threat Still Worries

Since the rise of ISIS in 2014, law enforcement around the world has struggled to stop countless plots. While attacks in Europe and North America have dropped dramatically this year, attacks in Afghanistan, and other countries are rising, according to the Foundation for Defense of Democracies in Washington. Rukmini Callimachi, an award-winning New York Times foreign correspondent, joins us to discuss why the recent dip in Western attacks is “scant comfort” for law enforcement. Callimachi is widely considered one of the world’s foremost experts on ISIS and al-Qaeda operations. While covering terrorism in West Africa for the Associated Press, she discovered thousands of pages of internal al-Qaeda documents that revealed the organization’s inner workings. Her podcast,Caliphate, tracks the rise of ISIS.