New Report Reveals Middle Eastern Attitudes Toward Media Use

In this Monday, May 20, 2019 photo, Facebook’s Managing Director for the Middle East and North Africa, Ramez Shehadi speaks to The Associated Press at the Facebook office in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with its long days of fasting and prayer meant to draw worshippers closer to God and away from worldly distractions, is being reshaped by technology. People in the Middle East are spending close to 58 million more hours on Facebook and watching more YouTube videos than at any other time of the year, making Ramadan the biggest moment of the year for advertisers.
In this Monday, May 20, 2019 photo, Facebook's Managing Director for the Middle East and North Africa, Ramez Shehadi speaks to The Associated Press at the Facebook office in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with its long days of fasting and prayer meant to draw worshippers closer to God and away from worldly distractions, is being reshaped by technology. People in the Middle East are spending close to 58 million more hours on Facebook and watching more YouTube videos than at any other time of the year, making Ramadan the biggest moment of the year for advertisers. Kamran Jebreili / AP Photo
In this Monday, May 20, 2019 photo, Facebook’s Managing Director for the Middle East and North Africa, Ramez Shehadi speaks to The Associated Press at the Facebook office in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with its long days of fasting and prayer meant to draw worshippers closer to God and away from worldly distractions, is being reshaped by technology. People in the Middle East are spending close to 58 million more hours on Facebook and watching more YouTube videos than at any other time of the year, making Ramadan the biggest moment of the year for advertisers.
In this Monday, May 20, 2019 photo, Facebook's Managing Director for the Middle East and North Africa, Ramez Shehadi speaks to The Associated Press at the Facebook office in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with its long days of fasting and prayer meant to draw worshippers closer to God and away from worldly distractions, is being reshaped by technology. People in the Middle East are spending close to 58 million more hours on Facebook and watching more YouTube videos than at any other time of the year, making Ramadan the biggest moment of the year for advertisers. Kamran Jebreili / AP Photo

New Report Reveals Middle Eastern Attitudes Toward Media Use

The share of nationals in seven Middle Eastern countries who say film and TV content from the U.S. and Hollywood is “good for morality” has increased since 2014, according to a recent report from Northwestern University in Qatar. The report, about media use in the Middle East in 2018, includes data from Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. Among the published findings are that Facebook and Twitter usage are plummeting across the Middle East and that only in Egypt and Saudi Arabia did “a majority of nationals say it is the responsibility of government to block objectionable content.” Dean and CEO of Northwestern University in Qatar Everette Dennis was lead investigator on the report. He joins Worldview to help us think through what the report tells us about the media landscape in the Middle East and what it is like to train the next generation of journalists in the region. Dennis is also a professor at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.