Origins And Effects Of America’s Tipping Culture

A form that tells diners there is no built-in service charge on their bill and that a gratuity of 15-20 percent for quality service is customary is seen in Santa Monica, California on Wednesday, April 14, 1999.
A form that tells diners there is no built-in service charge on their bill and that a gratuity of 15-20 percent for quality service is customary is seen in Santa Monica, California on Wednesday, April 14, 1999. AP Photo/Reed Saxon
A form that tells diners there is no built-in service charge on their bill and that a gratuity of 15-20 percent for quality service is customary is seen in Santa Monica, California on Wednesday, April 14, 1999.
A form that tells diners there is no built-in service charge on their bill and that a gratuity of 15-20 percent for quality service is customary is seen in Santa Monica, California on Wednesday, April 14, 1999. AP Photo/Reed Saxon

Origins And Effects Of America’s Tipping Culture

As the #MeToo movement reveals varying examples of sexual harassment in many different workplaces, some argue that tipping enables sexual harassers to act with impunity against wait staff, dependent on customer generosity for their wages. A report from Restaurant Opportunities Center finds that 90 percent in the U.S. restaurant industry report unwanted sexual advances at work. More than half of women say these interactions occur weekly. We’ll discuss with Steve Dublanica, author of Keep the Change. The book delves into the history of tipping in America and its impact on people in the service industry. We’ll also hear from Remy, a restaurant waitress on Chicago’s North Side. We’ve excluded Remy’s last name to protect her identity.