Questions Loom Around Turkish Referendum

Supporters of Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gather for a rally outside the Presidential Palace, in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, April 17, 2017, one day after the referendum. Turkey’s main opposition party urged the country’s electoral board Monday to cancel the results of a landmark referendum that granted sweeping new powers to Erdogan, citing what it called substantial voting irregularities.
Supporters of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gather for a rally outside the Presidential Palace, in Ankara, Turkey, one day after the referendum. Turkey's main opposition party urged the country's electoral board Monday to cancel the results of a landmark referendum that granted sweeping new powers to Erdogan, citing what it called substantial voting irregularities. Burhan Ozbilici / AP Photo
Supporters of Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gather for a rally outside the Presidential Palace, in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, April 17, 2017, one day after the referendum. Turkey’s main opposition party urged the country’s electoral board Monday to cancel the results of a landmark referendum that granted sweeping new powers to Erdogan, citing what it called substantial voting irregularities.
Supporters of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gather for a rally outside the Presidential Palace, in Ankara, Turkey, one day after the referendum. Turkey's main opposition party urged the country's electoral board Monday to cancel the results of a landmark referendum that granted sweeping new powers to Erdogan, citing what it called substantial voting irregularities. Burhan Ozbilici / AP Photo

Questions Loom Around Turkish Referendum

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan claimed a victory in the referendum held over the weekend when a majority of voters cast their ballot in favor of changes to Turkey’s constitution that grant more power to the country’s president.

The “yes” vote won by a slim majority and opposition parties have asked for a partial recount. International monitors say the no campaign did not receive equal treatment by the media and claim there questions about whether all the ballots counted were legitimate.

For a look at the implications of the referendum, we speak with sociologist Sinan Erensu. He is a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University and is originally from Turkey.