Sudanese Protests Succeed In Deposing President, But Military Now Has Power

Protesters carry national flags at at rally in front of the military headquarters in the capital Khartoum, Sudan, Monday, April 8, 2019. Organizers behind anti-government demonstrations in Sudan said security forces attempted to break up a sit-in outside the military headquarters. A spokeswoman for the Sudanese Professionals Association told The Associated Press that clashes erupted early Monday between security forces and protesters, who have been camped out in front of the complex in Khartoum since Saturday.
Protesters carry national flags at at rally in front of the military headquarters in the capital Khartoum, Sudan, Monday, April 8, 2019. Organizers behind anti-government demonstrations in Sudan said security forces attempted to break up a sit-in outside the military headquarters. A spokeswoman for the Sudanese Professionals Association told The Associated Press that clashes erupted early Monday between security forces and protesters, who have been camped out in front of the complex in Khartoum since Saturday. AP Photo
Protesters carry national flags at at rally in front of the military headquarters in the capital Khartoum, Sudan, Monday, April 8, 2019. Organizers behind anti-government demonstrations in Sudan said security forces attempted to break up a sit-in outside the military headquarters. A spokeswoman for the Sudanese Professionals Association told The Associated Press that clashes erupted early Monday between security forces and protesters, who have been camped out in front of the complex in Khartoum since Saturday.
Protesters carry national flags at at rally in front of the military headquarters in the capital Khartoum, Sudan, Monday, April 8, 2019. Organizers behind anti-government demonstrations in Sudan said security forces attempted to break up a sit-in outside the military headquarters. A spokeswoman for the Sudanese Professionals Association told The Associated Press that clashes erupted early Monday between security forces and protesters, who have been camped out in front of the complex in Khartoum since Saturday. AP Photo

Sudanese Protests Succeed In Deposing President, But Military Now Has Power

After months of widespread protests against his regime, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has been forced from power by a military coup. Speaking on state television, Bashir’s defense minister Awad ibn Auf announced the suspension of the Constitution, the imposition of a three-month state of emergency and the shift of power to an army-led transitional government that would operate for two years before holding elections. Prominent opposition groups that have been coordinating the protests refuse to accept military rule, however. One of them, the Sudanese Professionals Association, vowed to continue resisting and said in a tweet that it demands the “handover of power to a civilian transitional government that reflects the forces of the revolution.” Journalist Stephen Franklin, former foreign correspondent and labor writer for the Chicago Tribune, worked in Sudan and joins us to talk about next steps for the government and the groups demanding further change.