The Rise Of The Right In Slovakia

Slovakia1 (podcast) : Slovak police officers detain Marian Kotleba, center, leader of officially banned association Slovak Togetherness, during a rally in Bratislava, Saturday, March 14, 2009. Some 300 people gathered in downtown Bratislava to mark the 70th anniversary of the independent Nazi-sponsored Slovak State. (AP Photo/CTK, Jan Koller)
Slovak police officers detain Marian Kotleba, center, leader of officially banned association Slovak Togetherness, during a rally in Bratislava, Saturday, March 14, 2009. Some 300 people gathered in downtown Bratislava to mark the 70th anniversary of the independent Nazi-sponsored Slovak State. Jan Koller / AP Photo/CTK
Slovakia1 (podcast) : Slovak police officers detain Marian Kotleba, center, leader of officially banned association Slovak Togetherness, during a rally in Bratislava, Saturday, March 14, 2009. Some 300 people gathered in downtown Bratislava to mark the 70th anniversary of the independent Nazi-sponsored Slovak State. (AP Photo/CTK, Jan Koller)
Slovak police officers detain Marian Kotleba, center, leader of officially banned association Slovak Togetherness, during a rally in Bratislava, Saturday, March 14, 2009. Some 300 people gathered in downtown Bratislava to mark the 70th anniversary of the independent Nazi-sponsored Slovak State. Jan Koller / AP Photo/CTK

The Rise Of The Right In Slovakia

A neo- Nazi party and its leader made a strong showing in Slovakia’s recent elections, winning enough votes to gain 14 seats in parliament.

Marian Kotleba, the leader of the ultra-nationalist People’s Party-Our Slovakia, actually, until recently, used to dress in a uniform that resembled those worn by the country’s Nazi government in power during WWII. The party that won the election, the ruling party, also campaigned on an anti-migrant ticket.

We take a look at the rise of the far right in Slovakia with Lenka Bustikova, assistant professor of political science at Arizona State University.