The Shifting Asylum Vetting Process In Germany

In this March 3, 2016 file photo a child screams while holding paper that reads: “Merkel Help Us” as migrants block a railway during a protest demanding the opening of the border between Greece and Macedonia in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni.
In this March 3, 2016 file photo a child screams while holding paper that reads: "Merkel Help Us" as migrants block a railway during a protest demanding the opening of the border between Greece and Macedonia in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni. AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda
In this March 3, 2016 file photo a child screams while holding paper that reads: “Merkel Help Us” as migrants block a railway during a protest demanding the opening of the border between Greece and Macedonia in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni.
In this March 3, 2016 file photo a child screams while holding paper that reads: "Merkel Help Us" as migrants block a railway during a protest demanding the opening of the border between Greece and Macedonia in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni. AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda

The Shifting Asylum Vetting Process In Germany

Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees worked in anonymity for years. When the country welcomed a million asylum seekers, the agency was overwhelmed and caught in the crosshairs of a fierce political debate. One staffer told The Atlantic’s Graeme Wood, “One side thinks we’re bleeding hearts the other thinks we’re fascists.” Wood gained unprecedented access to an asylum screening process that’s rejecting about a third of all applicants. We talk with Wood about his piece, “The Refugee Detectives,” and the moral quandaries behind Germany’s approach to uncover the truth about people’s reasons for entering Germany.