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Carrie Shepherd

Carrie Shepherd

Senior Morning Shift Producer

Carrie Shepherd is Senior Producer of the live, daily news show Morning Shift.

In this role she’s responsible for the editorial mission of the program, working with the host and producers to determine what stories to cover, how show segments are executed and what guests are interviewed. Before taking over as Senior Producer of Morning Shift in 2012, Carrie was Senior Producer of Eight Forty-Eight, a daily morning newsmagazine. Carrie joined Eight Forty-Eight as a producer in 2009 after serving as a Web producer at WBEZ. In that role, she and a team of three producers led the overhaul of the WBEZ Website to include reporters’ stories, audio from the daily shows and multimedia presentations including audio slideshows and video. Carrie’s radio work has won awards from Associated Press, Chicago Headline Club, Association for Women in Communications and National Association of Black Journalists.

Carrie’s very interested in film and has served as a production assistant on live video shoots, and moderated documentary film discussions as part of the Independent Lens series.

Recent Stories


Advocacy Group Encouraged By Gov. Rauner's Rape Kit Response

The founder of a local advocacy group for rape victims says the campaign to draw attention to untested rape kits is making headway but the fight continues.


Few Governors Endorse Advocacy Group's Call To Prioritize Rape Kit Testing

Two weeks ago, an advocacy group sent every governor a rape kit and asked them to endorse their call to action.

Morning Shift

Father Finds Forgiveness Eases Pain Of Son’s Murder

Twenty years ago, Steve Young stood by helplessly as his son died from a gunshot wound. Today, he’s speaking out about forgiveness.


Impact of raising minimum wage

Looking at Chicago's new minimum wage hike from a number of angles, the happiness level of vegetarians, and music from A Christmas Carol.

Curious City

Why the numbered streets?

A tip from a Curious City fan helps clarify just what the heck city leaders were thinking when they gave South Side streets numbers. 

Curious City

The mystery behind Chicago’s streets could lie in maps

When Evanstonian Mark Sheldon inquired why streets on the city’s North Side are named and streets on the South Side are numbered, who better to ask than our esteemed cadre of Chicago historians? Admittedly, I thought they would have the answer at the ready. “Oh yes, of course, the great street mystery! I know why.” Not so fast...

Curious City

Commuters count on the South Side, read on the North?

If Chicago streets are messing with our directional skills, can historians come to the rescue? Curious City takes on a question posed by Mark Sheldon about why Chicago's sensible numbered streets system doesn't extend to the North.

Eight Forty-Eight

Durbin girds for campaign-finance fight with Citizens United

The U.S. senator told WBEZ he wants to remove the majority of campaign money from the few hands that might discourage "mere mortals" from running a viable campaign.

Eight Forty-Eight

Nation's oldest court reporting program turns 100

Chicagoans planning to continue their education have many options, but there's one school in the heart of the Loop that has a deep history with a specialty education track: MacCormac College has the country's oldest court reporting program, and 2012 marks its centennial anniversary.

Eight Forty-Eight

Chicago housing more affordable

The National Housing Conference and Center for Housing Policy report comes after an extended period of foreclosures and stagnant sales.

Eight Forty-Eight

Real estate report shows signs of improvement

Dennis Rodkin and Bob Floss join Eight Forty-Eight on Monday to discuss the health of Chicago's real estate market. Rodkin does concede that there have been some positive changes on the market recently, but Chicago isn't improving at the same rate as other cities.

Afternoon Shift

Farm Bill effects: How dinner makes it to the kitchen

While the Farm Bill has an obvious impact on farmers, it also affects consumers and the food we eat. The biggest issue with how food travels from farm to grocer to kitchen table is market control by a few companies, says one expert.


Digging for copper, finding Buddhist treasures

When the China Metallurgical Construction Company purchased a mine in Mes Aynak, Afghanistan, they found more than copper: Ancient Buddhist artifacts were buried below.

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