20 Years Later: How 9/11 Changed Surveillance, Privacy And What We’ve Learned Since

Facebook Messenger Kids Complaint
In this Feb. 16, 2018, photo, Facebook and Facebook's Messenger Kids app icons are displayed on an iPhone in New York. The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and other groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday, Oct. 3, to investigate Facebook’s Messenger Kids for violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) Richard Drew / Associated Press
Facebook Messenger Kids Complaint
In this Feb. 16, 2018, photo, Facebook and Facebook's Messenger Kids app icons are displayed on an iPhone in New York. The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and other groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday, Oct. 3, to investigate Facebook’s Messenger Kids for violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) Richard Drew / Associated Press

20 Years Later: How 9/11 Changed Surveillance, Privacy And What We’ve Learned Since

In the days following 9/11, lawmakers and residents were gripped with feelings of insecurity, and fear of when the next terror attack would come. That led to the creation and expansion of sweeping surveillance powers for U.S. intelligence agencies. Over the last two decades, mass surveillance in the U.S. has become almost a way of life. So how did the Sept. 11 attacks change how we balance safety and privacy today? And what lessons have we learned from the last 20 years?

GUESTS: Patrick Toomey, senior staff attorney at the ACLU

Sharon Bradford Franklin, co-director at Center for Democracy and Technology’s Security and Surveillance Project