What’s Next For Raul Castro, Cuba And U.S. Foreign Policy

A girl holds up a photo of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and his brother, President Raul Castro, at the May Day celebration in Revolution Square in Havana, Cuba, Sunday May 1, 2011. The demonstration is being touted as a massive show of support for economic changes recently approved by the Communist Party - even though the people holding placards and shouting slogans haven't seen the details yet.
A girl holds up a photo of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and his brother, President Raul Castro, at the May Day celebration in Revolution Square in Havana, Cuba in 2011. Javier Galeano / AP Photo
A girl holds up a photo of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and his brother, President Raul Castro, at the May Day celebration in Revolution Square in Havana, Cuba, Sunday May 1, 2011. The demonstration is being touted as a massive show of support for economic changes recently approved by the Communist Party - even though the people holding placards and shouting slogans haven't seen the details yet.
A girl holds up a photo of Cuba's revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and his brother, President Raul Castro, at the May Day celebration in Revolution Square in Havana, Cuba in 2011. Javier Galeano / AP Photo

What’s Next For Raul Castro, Cuba And U.S. Foreign Policy

In 1953, while on trial for leading an attack on the Moncada barracks, Fidel Castro delivered a four hour speech in his own defense, declaring: “Condemn me. It does not matter. History with absolve me.” 

The former Cuban leader died on Friday at the age of 90. We look at how history will judge the Castro legacy and discuss what happens next in Cuba and with U.S.-Cuban relations with journalist Patrick Symmesauthor of the forthcoming book The Day Fidel Died.