Eyes on Mexico: Treatment of Central American Migrants

A Central American migrant carries a child as he waits for his humanitarian visa from Mexican migration officials to be processed, on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, near Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. Many Central American migrants are waiting for Mexican officials to issue them humanitarian visas, which give them permission to be in Mexico for one year.
A Central American migrant carries a child as he waits for his humanitarian visa from Mexican migration officials to be processed, on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, near Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. Many Central American migrants are waiting for Mexican officials to issue them humanitarian visas, which give them permission to be in Mexico for one year. Marco Ugarte / AP Photo
A Central American migrant carries a child as he waits for his humanitarian visa from Mexican migration officials to be processed, on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, near Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. Many Central American migrants are waiting for Mexican officials to issue them humanitarian visas, which give them permission to be in Mexico for one year.
A Central American migrant carries a child as he waits for his humanitarian visa from Mexican migration officials to be processed, on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, near Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. Many Central American migrants are waiting for Mexican officials to issue them humanitarian visas, which give them permission to be in Mexico for one year. Marco Ugarte / AP Photo

Eyes on Mexico: Treatment of Central American Migrants

Organized crime and violence in the Central American “Northern Triangle” countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador has resulted in thousands of migrants fleeing their homes and journeying north into Mexico. Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala and Belize was historically porous, but an increase in Central American migrants crossing through Mexico and seeking asylum in the US in 2014 and 2015 prompted the Obama administration to work with the Peña Nieto administration in Mexico to step up security. Mexican civil rights groups have organized to assist the migrants as they arrive, helping them navigate asylum frameworks and decide whether to continue on to the US or stay in Mexico. Helena Olea, an international human rights lawyer who serves as Alianza Americas’ Human Rights Adviser, joins today’s Eyes On Mexico to discuss the situation at the southern Mexican border and what’s changed under the new Mexican president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.