A Conversation With Erika Lee On ‘The Making Of Asian America

Illinois Schools Survey
The American flag hangs in a Peck Elementary School classroom Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Chicago. Illinois education officials expect more than a million students, parents and teachers to give opinions about what they like and dislike at school in a first-of-its-kind survey. The online survey began Friday and runs through March 31. A 2011 state law requires that children in grades 6-12 and teachers in all elementary and secondary schools be given the survey. They and parents can choose not to participate. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) / Associated Press
Illinois Schools Survey
The American flag hangs in a Peck Elementary School classroom Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Chicago. Illinois education officials expect more than a million students, parents and teachers to give opinions about what they like and dislike at school in a first-of-its-kind survey. The online survey began Friday and runs through March 31. A 2011 state law requires that children in grades 6-12 and teachers in all elementary and secondary schools be given the survey. They and parents can choose not to participate. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) / Associated Press

A Conversation With Erika Lee On ‘The Making Of Asian America

Most U.S. history classes making little more than passing references to the impact Asian Americans have had on the nation or to the discrimination many faced after arriving in the United States as immigrants.

With Illinois poised to become the first state to require instruction in Asian American history in high schools, Reset checks in with a scholar on the subject for a primer.

GUEST: Erika Lee, regents professor of history and Asian American studies;

director of the immigration history research center at the University of Minnesota; author of The Making Of Asian America: A History