ADL: Alleged Kenosha Shooter’s Social Media Posts Show ‘Extremist’ Views

Film Emanuel Church
FILE - In this June 24, 2015, file photo Sen. Clementa Pinckney's wife Jennifer Pinckney, center, and her daughters, Eliana, left, and Malana, right, follow his casket into the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. The Rev. Clementa Pinckney, was one of the nine killed by Dylann Roof, who sat through 45 minutes of Bible study at the church before firing shots. Pinckney and her daughter, Malana, were in the late reverend’s office when they heard gun shots in another room. Rainier Ehrhardt / AP Photo
Film Emanuel Church
FILE - In this June 24, 2015, file photo Sen. Clementa Pinckney's wife Jennifer Pinckney, center, and her daughters, Eliana, left, and Malana, right, follow his casket into the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. The Rev. Clementa Pinckney, was one of the nine killed by Dylann Roof, who sat through 45 minutes of Bible study at the church before firing shots. Pinckney and her daughter, Malana, were in the late reverend’s office when they heard gun shots in another room. Rainier Ehrhardt / AP Photo

ADL: Alleged Kenosha Shooter’s Social Media Posts Show ‘Extremist’ Views

Reset speaks with the Anti-Defamation League about the rise of white supremacist groups in the U.S. following recent civil unrest in Kenosha, Wis. The city has seen nightly unrest since Sunday, when a white police officer shot a Black man repeatedly.

GUEST: Oren Segal, vice president of the Anti-Defamation League’s Center On Extremism