Advocates argue hiring people with criminal records could address the labor shortage, supply chain issues

Women in Construction
Zakiyyah Askia, a female plumber, welds pipes at a high rise residence under construction in Chicago on Jan. 24, 2019. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics says women still represent only 3.4 percent of the nation’s 8.3 million construction workers, but that’s an improvement over 2.5 percent a decade ago. Teresa Crawford / Associated Press
Women in Construction
Zakiyyah Askia, a female plumber, welds pipes at a high rise residence under construction in Chicago on Jan. 24, 2019. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics says women still represent only 3.4 percent of the nation’s 8.3 million construction workers, but that’s an improvement over 2.5 percent a decade ago. Teresa Crawford / Associated Press

Advocates argue hiring people with criminal records could address the labor shortage, supply chain issues

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Having a criminal record makes it difficult to find a job, and there are millions of formerly incarcerated people around the country in need of work.

Reset talks with two people who argue that tapping the potential of people who have spent time behind bars could help solve problems in our economy, reduce recidivism and build a safer, healthier society.

GUESTS: Pierre Laguerre, founder and CEO of Fleeting

Brandon Williams, Supervising Attorney of criminal records at Cabrini Green Legal Aid