After Two More Mass Shootings, What's the Relationship Between Gun Laws and White Nationalist Terrorism?

Dr. Julio Novoa, left, and Danielle Novoa, right, visit a makeshift memorial with their 10-month-old son Richard Novoa at the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.
Dr. Julio Novoa, left, and Danielle Novoa, right, visit a makeshift memorial with their 10-month-old son Richard Novoa at the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas. John Locher / AP Photo
Dr. Julio Novoa, left, and Danielle Novoa, right, visit a makeshift memorial with their 10-month-old son Richard Novoa at the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.
Dr. Julio Novoa, left, and Danielle Novoa, right, visit a makeshift memorial with their 10-month-old son Richard Novoa at the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas. John Locher / AP Photo

After Two More Mass Shootings, What's the Relationship Between Gun Laws and White Nationalist Terrorism?

As of Sunday, there have been 251 mass shootings in the U.S. in 2019, according to data from the nonprofit Gun Violence Archive. Among those shootings were one each in Texas and Ohio over the weekend, which left at least 30 people dead. “The United States continues to be peculiar in handing out powerful magazine-fed firearms to almost anyone who wants one and not requiring background checks on private purchases even if these are made at gun shows or by persons with a history of mental illness,” wrote Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, on his website “Informed Consent.” Cole joins us to discuss the differences between white nationalist terrorism and other forms of terrorism, as well as flaws in U.S. policy related to gun control and gun violence.