After Years Of Resistance, Chicago Plans To Replace Lead Pipes

Chicago has the most lead service lines than any other city in the country, which can cause negative impacts on residents’ health.

A close up view of a partial lead service line replacement, which shows an old lead pipe connected to a new copper pipe
Miguel Del Toral said city workers attached this copper pipe to his lead water service line outside his Southwest Side home in 2012. Photo courtesy of Miguel Del Toral, Photo illustration by Paula Friedrich/WBEZ
A close up view of a partial lead service line replacement, which shows an old lead pipe connected to a new copper pipe
Miguel Del Toral said city workers attached this copper pipe to his lead water service line outside his Southwest Side home in 2012. Photo courtesy of Miguel Del Toral, Photo illustration by Paula Friedrich/WBEZ

After Years Of Resistance, Chicago Plans To Replace Lead Pipes

Chicago has the most lead service lines than any other city in the country, which can cause negative impacts on residents’ health.

After years of resisting, denying and even avoiding the issue, Chicago is finally going to start replacing its lead pipes. Reset learns about the city’s plan, the dangers of lead exposure and why it’s taken so long for elected officials to act.

GUESTS: Michael Hawthorne, environment and public health reporter at the Chicago Tribune

Troy Hernandez, coordinating committee at Pilsen Environmental Rights and Reform Organization (P.E.R.R.O.)