How American consumerism plays a role in the global supply chain crisis

The pandemic has disrupted supply chains around the world, but some experts say our spending habits are part of the problem.

How American consumerism plays a role in the global supply chain crisis
A Cosco container ship is docked at the Port of Long Beach in Long Beach, Calif., Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. California state lawmakers held a joint legislative hearing at the Capitol in Sacramento, Wednesday, Nov. 3, to discusses the supply chain disruptions. While congestion at the state's ports have slowed deliveries of imports, it's also made it harder for the state's farmers to export crops to markets in Asia. Jae C. Hong, File / AP Photo
How American consumerism plays a role in the global supply chain crisis
A Cosco container ship is docked at the Port of Long Beach in Long Beach, Calif., Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. California state lawmakers held a joint legislative hearing at the Capitol in Sacramento, Wednesday, Nov. 3, to discusses the supply chain disruptions. While congestion at the state's ports have slowed deliveries of imports, it's also made it harder for the state's farmers to export crops to markets in Asia. Jae C. Hong, File / AP Photo

How American consumerism plays a role in the global supply chain crisis

The pandemic has disrupted supply chains around the world, but some experts say our spending habits are part of the problem.

During the pandemic, disruptions to the global supply chain have led to shipping delays and higher prices, but the demand for goods remains strong.

Reset brings on a psychologist to discuss what drives spending habits and what’s behind American consumerism.

GUEST: Stuart Vyse, psychologist, columnist for Skeptical Inquiry magazine, author of Going Broke: Why Americans (Still) Can’t Hold On To Their Money