An Economic Development Agenda For Chicago’s Next Mayor

A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Chicago. Census data shows the Chicago region has lost more residents than any other U.S. metropolitan area, a drop that comes as other Midwestern cities lost population and South and Southwest parts of the country saw gains.
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago in March. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Chicago. Census data shows the Chicago region has lost more residents than any other U.S. metropolitan area, a drop that comes as other Midwestern cities lost population and South and Southwest parts of the country saw gains.
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago in March. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

An Economic Development Agenda For Chicago’s Next Mayor

Jobs, transportation, affordable housing, and equity overall. Those are a few of issues that Chicago's next mayor will likely be thinking about as he or she decides how to approach economic development. 

Many of the 14 candidates are calling for renewed economic development in Chicago's 77 neighborhoods. Mayor Emanuel has sometimes been criticized for focusing too much on downtown, and the field seems to be taking that into consideration as they flesh out their platforms a month before election day. 

Morning Shift digs into some of the economic development challenges that Chicago's next mayor will face when he or she takes office in May.

GUEST: David Doig, president of Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives