As More Parents Return To Work, How Will The Transition Affect Mothers?

“We know that other countries have social safety nets. In the U.S., we have women,” said sociologist Jessica Calarco.

Moms pandemic
Vicky Li Yip, center, pats her daughter Kelsey's head, as her son Toby looks back, outside their home, Friday, July 10, 2020, in Houston. Vicky Li Yip works from home and says online schooling has been exhausting, even with her husband helping out. David J. Phillip / AP Photo
Moms pandemic
Vicky Li Yip, center, pats her daughter Kelsey's head, as her son Toby looks back, outside their home, Friday, July 10, 2020, in Houston. Vicky Li Yip works from home and says online schooling has been exhausting, even with her husband helping out. David J. Phillip / AP Photo

As More Parents Return To Work, How Will The Transition Affect Mothers?

“We know that other countries have social safety nets. In the U.S., we have women,” said sociologist Jessica Calarco.

The COVID-19 pandemic led to America’s first recession where women were hurt more than men. Research shows mothers have especially borne the brunt of the pandemic’s economic toll, with many leaving their jobs or cutting back on work to take on child care and household duties.

Reset talks to a sociologist and opens the phones to listeners to discuss how mothers are navigating parenting and work, and how the country can address its child care crisis as more parents return to the office.

GUEST: Jessica Calarco, associate professor of sociology at Indiana University