Biggest Protests Yet in Hong Kong

Demonstrators carry umbrellas as they march along a street in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. Heavy rain fell on tens of thousands of umbrella-ready protesters Sunday as they started marching from a packed park in central Hong Kong, where mass pro-democracy demonstrations have become a regular weekend activity.
Demonstrators carry umbrellas as they march along a street in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. Heavy rain fell on tens of thousands of umbrella-ready protesters Sunday as they started marching from a packed park in central Hong Kong, where mass pro-democracy demonstrations have become a regular weekend activity. Vincent Yu / AP Photo
Demonstrators carry umbrellas as they march along a street in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. Heavy rain fell on tens of thousands of umbrella-ready protesters Sunday as they started marching from a packed park in central Hong Kong, where mass pro-democracy demonstrations have become a regular weekend activity.
Demonstrators carry umbrellas as they march along a street in Hong Kong, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. Heavy rain fell on tens of thousands of umbrella-ready protesters Sunday as they started marching from a packed park in central Hong Kong, where mass pro-democracy demonstrations have become a regular weekend activity. Vincent Yu / AP Photo

Biggest Protests Yet in Hong Kong

An estimated 1.7 million people took to the streets of Hong Kong over the weekend, defying rain and a police order not to protest. Unlike in previous weeks of protests, riot police did not resort to firing tear gas against protesters, most of whom demonstrated peacefully. Months after the movement began over a controversial extradition bill, the demonstrations don’t seem to be waning. Now, protesters demand universal suffrage, and contest Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s close ties with China. Meanwhile, troop build ups right across the mainland China border in Shenzhen have led many to fear that Beijing might resort to a violent crackdown against the Hong Kongers. Chinese state media, as well as social media ads, have argued that the protesters are akin to terrorists, funded by Western interests to destabilize China from within. With us to discuss is Ting Guo, adjunct assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong.