Chicago’s Halloween Rules: ‘Yes’ To Trick-Or-Treating, But ‘No’ to Haunted Houses

Mayor Lori Lightfoot proposes “Halloweek,” a week of trick-or-treating, to keep groups small.

Halloween costume shopping
A customer looks through kids Halloween costumes at a Target department store on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, in Aventura, Fla. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot released rules for Halloween — "yes" to trick-or-treating, "no" to house parties and haunted houses. Brynn Anderson / Associated Press
Halloween costume shopping
A customer looks through kids Halloween costumes at a Target department store on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, in Aventura, Fla. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot released rules for Halloween — "yes" to trick-or-treating, "no" to house parties and haunted houses. Brynn Anderson / Associated Press

Chicago’s Halloween Rules: ‘Yes’ To Trick-Or-Treating, But ‘No’ to Haunted Houses

Mayor Lori Lightfoot proposes “Halloweek,” a week of trick-or-treating, to keep groups small.

The Halloween stakeholders have weighed in and the decision is in — trick-or-treating is on for Chicagoans this year.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s administration is officially releasing its list of Halloween rules: COVID-19 edition.

Dubbed “Halloweek,” trick-or-treaters are required to wear masks and “keep moving” while sticking to groups of six or fewer.

Haunted houses and house parties are strictly prohibited.

Trick-or-treaters are discouraged from sticking their hands in candy bowls, but candy consumption is encouraged. Blommer Chocolate will channel Willie Wonka with its plans to hide several “golden tickets” among 10,000 free Halloween candy bags it will be distributing over the week at events. Winners will get a 10-pound chocolate bar.

“This Halloween, we’re asking that people use their creativity and imagination not just on their costumes and decorations, but in how they safely celebrate,” said Chicago’s Public Health Commissioner Allison Arwady. “Maintain social distancing, keep to small groups and consider celebrating throughout the week to minimize congregation.

The Chicago Park District will host a series of virtual and in-person events starting Oct. 18 to encourage people to spread out their spooky celebrations over time and limit large gatherings.

Becky Vevea covers City Hall for WBEZ. Follow her @beckyvevea.