Colombian Peace Deal in Jeopardy as FARC Rebels Rearm; Alliance of Global Cities Strive to cut greenhouse gases by 80-100%; Global Activism: The Nourishment Projects

In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama’s special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities “the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again.“
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama's special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities "the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again." AP Photo
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama’s special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities “the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again.“
In this Jan. 6, 2016 file photo, Juliana, a 20-year-old rebel fighter for the 36th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rests from a trek in the northwest Andes of Colombia, in Antioquia state. On year after the Nov. 24 2016, peace accords between the Colombian government and the FARC rebels, Bernard Aronson, who served as President Barack Obama's special envoy to the peace talks, said that even if Colombia misses the historic opportunity to integrate its lawless countryside with the more prosperous cities "the war is over and nobody thinks it will restart again." AP Photo

Colombian Peace Deal in Jeopardy as FARC Rebels Rearm; Alliance of Global Cities Strive to cut greenhouse gases by 80-100%; Global Activism: The Nourishment Projects

On today’s show:

  • A peace deal that ended 50 years of civil war in Colombia is in jeopardy as FARC rebels accuse the government of not abiding by its terms.
  • An alliance of cities worldwide has committed to reducing their carbon emissions by 80-100 percent by 2050.
  • We hear from a Chicago-area engineer who left a successful career to start local peace-building initiatives across the globe.