Concerns Over Tar-Sands Oil Pipeline Through Chicago

Tania Aubid, a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, speaks at a brief rally by project opponents on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn., after the state Public Utilities Commission reaffirmed its support for Enbridge Energy's plan to replace its aging Line 3 crude oil pipeline across northern Minnesota. Enbridge wants to replace its existing Line 3 because it was built in the 1960s and is increasingly subject to cracking and corrosion.
Tania Aubid, a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, speaks at a brief rally by project opponents on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn., after the state Public Utilities Commission reaffirmed its support for Enbridge Energy's plan to replace its aging Line 3 crude oil pipeline across northern Minnesota. Enbridge wants to replace its existing Line 3 because it was built in the 1960s and is increasingly subject to cracking and corrosion. Steve Karnowski / AP Photo
Tania Aubid, a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, speaks at a brief rally by project opponents on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn., after the state Public Utilities Commission reaffirmed its support for Enbridge Energy's plan to replace its aging Line 3 crude oil pipeline across northern Minnesota. Enbridge wants to replace its existing Line 3 because it was built in the 1960s and is increasingly subject to cracking and corrosion.
Tania Aubid, a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, speaks at a brief rally by project opponents on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn., after the state Public Utilities Commission reaffirmed its support for Enbridge Energy's plan to replace its aging Line 3 crude oil pipeline across northern Minnesota. Enbridge wants to replace its existing Line 3 because it was built in the 1960s and is increasingly subject to cracking and corrosion. Steve Karnowski / AP Photo

Concerns Over Tar-Sands Oil Pipeline Through Chicago

A proposed tar-sands oil pipeline that would cross four Illinois counties has prompted concerns among some state residents about eminent domain rights and environmental impacts. The pipeline would run parallel to the existing Line 61, carrying oil to Pontiac, Illinois, where existing pipelines would carry it to the Gulf Coast for sale on the global market. Representatives of Save Our Illinois Land (SOIL), an organization opposing the pipeline, cite how Enbridge, the Canadian company behind the proposed construction, has a history of oil leaks and spills. However, proponents highlight how the pipeline could bring economic benefits to Illinois. Sandra and Dave Davis of SOIL join us to discuss the pipeline.