Economic Development A Top Issue For Chicago’s Next Mayor

A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Chicago. Census data shows the Chicago region has lost more residents than any other U.S. metropolitan area, a drop that comes as other Midwestern cities lost population and South and Southwest parts of the country saw gains.
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago in March. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Chicago. Census data shows the Chicago region has lost more residents than any other U.S. metropolitan area, a drop that comes as other Midwestern cities lost population and South and Southwest parts of the country saw gains.
A Chicago Transit Authority Green Line train travels West away from downtown Chicago in March. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

Economic Development A Top Issue For Chicago’s Next Mayor

Mayor Rahm Emanuel embraced development during his two terms in office, but some of his critics say he focused too much on downtown and not enough on the neighborhoods.

So, what would it take to truly transform Chicago’s communities, especially those that could use an economic boost?

And do our two mayoral candidates — Lori Lightfoot and Toni Preckwinkle — have what it takes to make it happen?

Morning Shift explores those questions and more in this look at neighborhood economic development in Chicago. 

GUEST: David Doig, president of Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives

Cecile De Mello, Englewood Quality of Life Plan program manager at Teamwork Englewood