Fair Map Amendment Arguments Head To Supreme Court

Newly proposed redistricting maps are displayed in the hallways of the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
FILE - Newly proposed redistricting maps are displayed in the hallways of the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill., during a Senate Redistricting Committee hearing on the proposed Illinois redistricting map, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Seth Perlman / AP Photo
Newly proposed redistricting maps are displayed in the hallways of the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
FILE - Newly proposed redistricting maps are displayed in the hallways of the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill., during a Senate Redistricting Committee hearing on the proposed Illinois redistricting map, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Seth Perlman / AP Photo

Fair Map Amendment Arguments Head To Supreme Court

Every ten years Illinois’ legislative districts are redrawn to reflect changing population patterns. The map is drawn up by lawmakers and that say opponents of this process, means politicians essentially pick candidates instead of voters.

There’s been a longtime effort to get a measure on the ballot to make the process more independent. The so-called Fair Map Amendment movement cleared a major hurdle by getting more than enough of the required petition signatures.

But so far courts have ruled against the group, saying the amendment is unconstitutional. Now the fight goes to the Illinois Supreme Court.

Morning Shift learns more about the fight and what’s at stake for voters and politicians from Sheila Simon, former Lt. Gov.