FROM THE ARCHIVES: The Fight Against GMOs

In this Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010 photo Giorgio Fidenato holds a raw ear of genetically modified yellow corn at his office in Pordenone, northern Italy. The European Union Court of Justice ruled Wednesday Sept. 13, 2017, in favor of Italian activist farmer Fidenato, saying Italy had no right to ban GMO crops given that there is no scientific evidence they are hazardous.
In this Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010 photo Giorgio Fidenato holds a raw ear of genetically modified yellow corn at his office in Pordenone, northern Italy. The European Union Court of Justice ruled Wednesday Sept. 13, 2017, in favor of Italian activist farmer Fidenato, saying Italy had no right to ban GMO crops given that there is no scientific evidence they are hazardous. Paolo Giovannini / AP Photo
In this Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010 photo Giorgio Fidenato holds a raw ear of genetically modified yellow corn at his office in Pordenone, northern Italy. The European Union Court of Justice ruled Wednesday Sept. 13, 2017, in favor of Italian activist farmer Fidenato, saying Italy had no right to ban GMO crops given that there is no scientific evidence they are hazardous.
In this Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010 photo Giorgio Fidenato holds a raw ear of genetically modified yellow corn at his office in Pordenone, northern Italy. The European Union Court of Justice ruled Wednesday Sept. 13, 2017, in favor of Italian activist farmer Fidenato, saying Italy had no right to ban GMO crops given that there is no scientific evidence they are hazardous. Paolo Giovannini / AP Photo

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The Fight Against GMOs

In 2003, the United States, Canada and Argentina launched a case against the European Union at the World Trade Organization (WTO), aiming to end the EU’s moratorium on genetically modified crops. President George W. Bush at the time argued that the restrictions would hinder efforts to combat hunger in Africa. Three years later, in 2006, the WTO ruled that European restrictions on genetically modified foods violated international trade rules, asserting that Europe’s ban on introducing new varieties of corn, soybeans and cotton was not scientifically justified. This segment aired on May 23, 2003, just after the U.S. announced plans to take a case to the WTO. Providing commentary were Rich Mills, a spokesperson for the Office of the United States Trade Representative, and Beate Gminder, a spokesperson for consumer protection and health for the EU.

Special thanks to the WBEZ Archives Team for cataloging 25 years of Worldview and making this segment possible.