Honduras Elections: From An On-The-Ground Perspective

An anti-government protestor chants slogans against Honduras President Juan Orlando Hernandez as protesters block a road on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017.
An anti-government protestor chants slogans against Honduras President Juan Orlando Hernandez as protesters block a road on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. AP Photo/Fernando Antonio
An anti-government protestor chants slogans against Honduras President Juan Orlando Hernandez as protesters block a road on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017.
An anti-government protestor chants slogans against Honduras President Juan Orlando Hernandez as protesters block a road on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. AP Photo/Fernando Antonio

Honduras Elections: From An On-The-Ground Perspective

Honduras still has no president. There are no certified results nearly two weeks after national elections.

The conservative incumbent, Juan Orlando Hernández, has been lauded by the Trump administration for lowering Honduras’ murder rate (one of the world’s highest) and police reform. Businessman and former sports broadcaster Salvador Nasralla ran as an anti-corruption outsider. As Hernández looked set to win, Nasralla accuses him of stealing the election and wants a recount.

Matt Ginsberg-Jaeckle was in Honduras to observe the elections. He is an interpreter/translator, community organizer, and member with Chicago-based human rights group La Voz de Los de Abajo.

Ginsberg-Jaeckle is back to give us an update, and joining him is Trinidad Sánchez, former director of Honduras-based Red Comal, a network of rural communities that work to promote human rights, rule of law, and social justice for poor farmers.