How Nationalism And Xenophobia Are Hurting The Cause Of Human Rights

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, at United Nations headquarters.
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, at United Nations headquarters. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, at United Nations headquarters.
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the U.N. General Assembly, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, at United Nations headquarters. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

How Nationalism And Xenophobia Are Hurting The Cause Of Human Rights

When the United Nations was formed, it was intended to prevent or deal with large-scale global war and conflict. But over the decades, its mission evolved to integrate human rights and humanitarian concerns like child soldiering, women’s security and landmine eradication.

Iain Levin, deputy executive director at Human Rights Watch, sees what he calls a “rollback” of this trend, due to a new wave of nationalism, led by the United States. Levine joins us to discuss how growing xenophobia and populism in Western Europe and the world has damaged the cause for human rights. 

Plus, a discussion about the “pick and choose“ manner in which the West and international criminal bodies, like the International Criminal Court, pursue justice in African nations.

GUEST:

Iain Levin, deputy executive director at Human Rights Watch