How Should the Media Cover Trump’s Tweets?

Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. Stephen Moore, a senior economic adviser to the president-elect, recently said Trump's party is no longer the party of Ronald Reagan and free trade.
Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. Stephen Moore, a senior economic adviser to the president-elect, recently said Trump's party is no longer the party of Ronald Reagan and free trade.
Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. Stephen Moore, a senior economic adviser to the president-elect, recently said Trump's party is no longer the party of Ronald Reagan and free trade.
Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally Oct. 10 in Ambridge, Pa. Stephen Moore, a senior economic adviser to the president-elect, recently said Trump's party is no longer the party of Ronald Reagan and free trade.

How Should the Media Cover Trump’s Tweets?

President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday took to Twitter to condemn people who burn the American flag, an issue that hasn't been in the spotlight of national politics for some time. Trump suggested that people who do burn flags should face "consequences," though the Supreme Court in 1989 ruled that flag burning is protected by the First Amendment. 

In 140 characters or less, Trump has used Twitter to rally supporters or enrage critics, making headlines along the way. During the weekend, Trump used Twitter to say he would have won the popular vote if millions of people were prevented from voting illegally, but he offered no evidence that directly supported his claim. 

So what should the media do when covering an incoming president who wields a Twitter account that generates some controversy? 

To help answer that question and more, Morning Shift talks to NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik.