How Solving Chicago’s Murders Could Be The Key To Preventing More

In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, D'Antignay Brashear shows a photo of her 4-year-old son, Kavan Collins, after he was shot on June 28, 2016, in Chicago. Collins was shot while holding Brashear's hand on the city's South Side. One of the bullets had struck him in his face, fracturing his jaw. With a spike in killings and shootings this year in Chicago, statistics show more bullets are hitting children as they do normal kid things like play with sparklers, draw on the sidewalk or hold a mother’s hand.
In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, D'Antignay Brashear shows a photo of her 4-year-old son, Kavan Collins, after he was shot on June 28, 2016, in Chicago. Collins was shot while holding Brashear's hand on the city's South Side. One of the bullets had struck him in his face, fracturing his jaw. With a spike in killings and shootings this year in Chicago, statistics show more bullets are hitting children as they do normal kid things like play with sparklers, draw on the sidewalk or hold a mother’s hand. Tae-Gyun Kim/AP
In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, D'Antignay Brashear shows a photo of her 4-year-old son, Kavan Collins, after he was shot on June 28, 2016, in Chicago. Collins was shot while holding Brashear's hand on the city's South Side. One of the bullets had struck him in his face, fracturing his jaw. With a spike in killings and shootings this year in Chicago, statistics show more bullets are hitting children as they do normal kid things like play with sparklers, draw on the sidewalk or hold a mother’s hand.
In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, D'Antignay Brashear shows a photo of her 4-year-old son, Kavan Collins, after he was shot on June 28, 2016, in Chicago. Collins was shot while holding Brashear's hand on the city's South Side. One of the bullets had struck him in his face, fracturing his jaw. With a spike in killings and shootings this year in Chicago, statistics show more bullets are hitting children as they do normal kid things like play with sparklers, draw on the sidewalk or hold a mother’s hand. Tae-Gyun Kim/AP

How Solving Chicago’s Murders Could Be The Key To Preventing More

The mayor had a lot to say about violence in Chicago and what can be done to face it head on. But one thing he didn’t mention was the Chicago Police Department’s high rate of unsolved murders. In fact, the murder clearance rate is less than half of the national average. CPD blames witnesses in communities who won’t cooperate; residents blame the police’s lack of motivation to solve the crime. Journalist Alex Kotlowitz joins us to talk about why there are so many unsolved cases in Chicago and what can be done about it.