How the pandemic is traumatizing U.S. health-care workers

Writer Ed Yong tells the story of America’s health-care workers who quit medicine due to burnout and grueling work conditions.

A hallway in a hospital
Some hospitals are facing a vicious cycle as nurses leave their staff jobs to make more money at other hospitals as traveling nurses. Training nurses in critical-care skills has become a fraught gamble, says Jonathan Emling, a nurse and the ECMO director at Ascension Saint Thomas in Nashville. Blake Farmer/WPLN News
A hallway in a hospital
Some hospitals are facing a vicious cycle as nurses leave their staff jobs to make more money at other hospitals as traveling nurses. Training nurses in critical-care skills has become a fraught gamble, says Jonathan Emling, a nurse and the ECMO director at Ascension Saint Thomas in Nashville. Blake Farmer/WPLN News

How the pandemic is traumatizing U.S. health-care workers

Writer Ed Yong tells the story of America’s health-care workers who quit medicine due to burnout and grueling work conditions.

Reset talks to Atlantic staff writer Ed Yong about his latest piece on why health-care workers are leaving the industry in droves, and what the mass-exodus means for the future of medicine.

GUEST: Ed Yong, staff writer at The Atlantic