In China, Civil Society Crackdowns Worry Human Rights Observers

A front page of a Chinese newspaper with a photo of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and the headline "Outsider counter attack" is displayed at a newsstand in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders. His threats to tear up trade deals and hike tariffs on Chinese goods could chill thriving commercial ties when Beijing is struggling to shore up economic growth. At the same time, Trump’s suggestion he might reduce Washington’s global strategic presence to focus on domestic issues would be a gift to Chinese leaders. They could expand their political and military profile in East Asia with less risk of conflict.
A front page of a Chinese newspaper with a photo of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and the headline "Outsider counter attack" is displayed at a newsstand in Beijing, China in November. Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders. His threats to tear up trade deals and hike tariffs on Chinese goods could chill thriving commercial ties when Beijing is struggling to shore up economic growth. At the same time, Trump’s suggestion he might reduce Washington’s global strategic presence to focus on domestic issues would be a gift to Chinese leaders. They could expand their political and military profile in East Asia with less risk of conflict. Ng Han Guan / AP Photo
A front page of a Chinese newspaper with a photo of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and the headline "Outsider counter attack" is displayed at a newsstand in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders. His threats to tear up trade deals and hike tariffs on Chinese goods could chill thriving commercial ties when Beijing is struggling to shore up economic growth. At the same time, Trump’s suggestion he might reduce Washington’s global strategic presence to focus on domestic issues would be a gift to Chinese leaders. They could expand their political and military profile in East Asia with less risk of conflict.
A front page of a Chinese newspaper with a photo of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and the headline "Outsider counter attack" is displayed at a newsstand in Beijing, China in November. Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders. His threats to tear up trade deals and hike tariffs on Chinese goods could chill thriving commercial ties when Beijing is struggling to shore up economic growth. At the same time, Trump’s suggestion he might reduce Washington’s global strategic presence to focus on domestic issues would be a gift to Chinese leaders. They could expand their political and military profile in East Asia with less risk of conflict. Ng Han Guan / AP Photo

In China, Civil Society Crackdowns Worry Human Rights Observers

During the 2016 presidential campaign, President-elect, Donald Trump threatened to end what he called China’s “currency manipulation,” by starting a trade war, if necessary. 

Language has been more conciliatory since the election, but that has human rights observers concerned that a Trump administration would ignore China's recent crackdowns on civil society and NGOs. For more, we turn to Sophie Richardson, Human Rights Watch’s China director.