Loyola University Chicago to divest from fossil fuel industry

Climate Gulf Oil Obsession
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, an oil pump works at sunset, in the desert oil fields of Sakhir, Bahrain. The global energy transition is perhaps nowhere more perplexing than in the Arabian Peninsula. The political stability of the six Gulf states -- Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain and Oman -- is rooted in profits from fossil fuels. They are privately and publicly advocating for carbon capture technologies rather than a rapid phasing out of burning fossil fuels. Hasan Jamali, File / AP Photo
Climate Gulf Oil Obsession
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, an oil pump works at sunset, in the desert oil fields of Sakhir, Bahrain. The global energy transition is perhaps nowhere more perplexing than in the Arabian Peninsula. The political stability of the six Gulf states -- Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain and Oman -- is rooted in profits from fossil fuels. They are privately and publicly advocating for carbon capture technologies rather than a rapid phasing out of burning fossil fuels. Hasan Jamali, File / AP Photo

Loyola University Chicago to divest from fossil fuel industry

Loyola University Chicago made a big announcement last week to divest from the fossil fuel industry and prioritize climate-friendly investments.

Loyola’s chief investment officer joins Reset to discuss how the school’s Jesuit mission drives its decision.

GUESTS: Karen Weigert, executive vice president at Slipstream, a clean energy innovation non-profit; former chief sustainability officer, city of Chicago

Katharine Wyatt, chief investment officer, Loyola University Chicago