Man Charged With Attempted Murder Of A Police Officer Was Shot In The Back By CPD, Defense Attorney Says

cook county courtroom
Today was the first court hearing for Latrell Allen, 20, who is charged with two counts of attempted murder of a police officer and one count of illegal gun posession. Allen’s defense attorney said his client was shot five times by police. M. Spencer Green / Associated Press
cook county courtroom
Today was the first court hearing for Latrell Allen, 20, who is charged with two counts of attempted murder of a police officer and one count of illegal gun posession. Allen’s defense attorney said his client was shot five times by police. M. Spencer Green / Associated Press

Man Charged With Attempted Murder Of A Police Officer Was Shot In The Back By CPD, Defense Attorney Says

Cook County prosecutors on Tuesday said a man shot by Chicago police on Sunday afternoon fired eight times at officers during a foot chase in the Englewood neighborhood. Authorities said the officers fired 13 times, based on shell casings recovered at the scene.

Prosecutors outlined some of their evidence at the first court hearing for Latrell Allen, 20, who is charged with two counts of attempted murder of a police officer and one count of illegal gun posession. Police said Allen’s shooting eventually prompted looting and mayhem in downtown Chicago on Sunday night and early Monday morning.

Allen did not appear at Tuesday’s hearing because he is still recovering at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The judge gave Allen a $1 million bond, but another legal case and a request by prosecutors to hold Allen in jail make his release unlikely even if he could come up with the money to pay the bond amount. Judge Susana Ortiz said she’d make a final decision on Allen’s detention when he is physically able to appear in court.

Assistant Public Defender Scott Finger, who is representing Allen, said his client was shot five times by police, once in the cheek and four times in the back. Prosecutors said Allen was shot in the cheek and abdomen.

Authorities say Allen shot at police first, forcing them to open fire.

None of the involved officers were wearing body cameras, despite previous pledges by the Chicago Police Department that all officers on patrol would be equipped with cameras.

Police and prosecutors said the officers did not have cameras because they were part of a newly created unit, called the Community Safety Team, and had not yet been provided with cameras.

Assistant Public Defender Scott Finger raised the issue of the lack of body cameras while questioning the case against his client.

“In 2020, they can’t get cameras on these officers?” Finger asked incredulously. “I think there’s an expectation that every officer have a camera on these days.”

And Finger questioned the police narrative that after the shooting they retraced the route of the foot chase and discovered a gun in an alley.

“They chase him down the alley after they shoot him, and then they leave a gun laying in the alley? That doesn’t make sense,” Finger said.

Prosecutors however countered that Allen matched the description provided by a 911 caller of a man with a gun, and that a social media photo showed Allen posing with a handgun that looked “exactly like” the gun that was recovered by police.

Prosecutors said that photo was one of several online posts that allegedly show Allen holding guns or flashing gang signs.

Finger said someone from the public defender’s office had so far only been able to speak with Allen briefly.

“He’s got broken teeth and broken gums so he wasn’t able to speak very well, and he is in a lot of pain,” Finger said.

Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown said looting and mayhem in downtown Chicago early Monday morning stemmed from anger and misinformation around Allen’s shooting.

Patrick Smith is a reporter on WBEZ’s Criminal Justice Desk. Follow him @pksmid. Email him at psmith@wbez.org.