‘Franchise’ Examines McDonald’s Complicated History With Black America

McDonald’s workers and supporters rally in Chicago in 2015 in what organizers at the time called the biggest-ever mobilization of U.S. workers.
McDonald's workers and supporters rally in Chicago in 2015 in what organizers at the time called the biggest-ever mobilization of U.S. workers.
McDonald’s workers and supporters rally in Chicago in 2015 in what organizers at the time called the biggest-ever mobilization of U.S. workers.
McDonald's workers and supporters rally in Chicago in 2015 in what organizers at the time called the biggest-ever mobilization of U.S. workers.

‘Franchise’ Examines McDonald’s Complicated History With Black America

McDonald’s has a long complicated history with black America. The golden arches have been criticized for rising rates in obesity and low-wage jobs. But Chicago-based McDonald’s — and other fast food chains — have a history connected to civil rights and black capitalism.

Chicago native and Georgetown University professor Marcia Chatelain uncovers this history in her new book, Franchise: The Golden Arches In Black America.

WBEZ’s Natalie Moore recently sat down with Chatelain for Reset to talk about her book, and how fast food became a fixture in black communities.

GUEST: Marcia Chatelain, author and Georgetown University professor