Menstrual Equity and Accessibility of Period Products

UGANDA AFRICA MENSTRUAL HYGIENE WOES
In this photo taken Thursday, July 13, 2017, a worker cuts locally made biodegradable sanitary pads known as Makapads, made from waste paper with papyrus as the absorbent, that sell for half the price of imported pads, at a factory in Kampala, Uganda. Menstrual hygiene has emerged as a serious, and often emotional, subject in Africa, where some experts say governments must supply free sanitary pads to girls who are often at risk of dropping out of school because of embarrassment. AP Photo
UGANDA AFRICA MENSTRUAL HYGIENE WOES
In this photo taken Thursday, July 13, 2017, a worker cuts locally made biodegradable sanitary pads known as Makapads, made from waste paper with papyrus as the absorbent, that sell for half the price of imported pads, at a factory in Kampala, Uganda. Menstrual hygiene has emerged as a serious, and often emotional, subject in Africa, where some experts say governments must supply free sanitary pads to girls who are often at risk of dropping out of school because of embarrassment. AP Photo

Menstrual Equity and Accessibility of Period Products

The stigma around menstruation and inaccessibility of affordable period products is keeping millions of young girls around the globe from getting an education. Women in developing countries like India and Kenya stay home from school 3-5 days every month as menstruating is considered a shame. India recently celebrated the removal of 12% tax on period products, making all female hygiene products tax-free. In the U.S., young girls and women living under the poverty line are also faced with similar issues, as 36 states still tax period products as non-essential.

Menstrual health organizations and female activists have been advocating for menstrual equity, and Former First Lady, Michelle Obama and Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle have also campaigned for the cause. Kiran Gandhi, M.I.A drummer and the iconic free-bleeding menstrual runner at the 2015 London Marathon, will be joining us to discuss how her music celebrates the female body. Molly Hayward, co-founder of Cora, will also join us to discuss how reproductive health education can open doors to gender equality and accessibility of affordable, high-quality period products in the U.S. and around the world.