‘Morning Shift’ Looks At The Life And Legacy Of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington

Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson.
Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson. AP Photo/Fred Jewell
Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson.
Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson. AP Photo/Fred Jewell

‘Morning Shift’ Looks At The Life And Legacy Of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington

When Chicago’s Mayor Harold Washington suffered a heart attack in his office on Nov. 25, 1987, WBEZ went wall-to-wall with coverage. NPR’s Cheryl Corley was a reporter with WBEZ at the time and was posted at City Hall for live updates.

On the 30th anniversary of the death of Chicago’s first black mayor, Morning Shift looks at the legacy of Harold Washington with the journalists who covered his reign over City Hall, and the chaotic political theater that played out after his death.

Reporters Cheryl Corley and John Holden stop by the Morning Shift to re-track the details of the day. We also hear from former aldermen Dick Mell, who played a critical role in helping to usher in Washington’s successor after the Mayor’s untimely death.