Newspapers Push Back On Trump Voter Fraud Commission

President Donald Trump waves to members of the media as he boards Air Force One at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, to travel to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was visiting Cincinnati to speak about healthcare and infrastructure. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Donald Trump waves to members of the media as he boards Air Force One at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, to travel to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was visiting Cincinnati to speak about healthcare and infrastructure. Andrew Harnik/AP
President Donald Trump waves to members of the media as he boards Air Force One at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, to travel to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was visiting Cincinnati to speak about healthcare and infrastructure. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Donald Trump waves to members of the media as he boards Air Force One at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, to travel to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was visiting Cincinnati to speak about healthcare and infrastructure. Andrew Harnik/AP

Newspapers Push Back On Trump Voter Fraud Commission

Last week, President Trump’s Advisory Commission on Election Integrity -- formed to look into the issue of voter fraud in America -- formally requested detailed voter information from each state. That information includes names, home addresses, birth dates, voting history, political party affiliation, last four digits of a voter’s social security, driver's license numbers, criminal history and military status. Forty-four states have already issued statements saying they would deny sending sensitive voter information to the White House -- though Illinois has notably stayed silent on the issue other to say that the state hasn’t received a formal request from the administration. 


But who isn't staying quiet are the media. More specifically, newspapers. As the country celebrated 241 years of independence yesterday, several newspapers’ editorial boards across the country took the opportunity to weigh in on Trump’s crusade on voter fraud.

Morning Shift talks to NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik for his take.