North Korea Accuses U.S. Of Attempting To Assassinate Kim Jong-un ​

A man walks past a board displaying United States and North Korea national flags in Beijing, Tuesday, May 2, 2017. President Donald Trump opened the door Monday to a future meeting with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, offering unusual praise for the globally ostracized leader at a time of surging nuclear tensions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
A man walks past a board displaying United States and North Korea national flags in Beijing, Tuesday, May 2, 2017. President Donald Trump opened the door Monday to a future meeting with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, offering unusual praise for the globally ostracized leader at a time of surging nuclear tensions. Andy Wong/AP
A man walks past a board displaying United States and North Korea national flags in Beijing, Tuesday, May 2, 2017. President Donald Trump opened the door Monday to a future meeting with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, offering unusual praise for the globally ostracized leader at a time of surging nuclear tensions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
A man walks past a board displaying United States and North Korea national flags in Beijing, Tuesday, May 2, 2017. President Donald Trump opened the door Monday to a future meeting with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, offering unusual praise for the globally ostracized leader at a time of surging nuclear tensions. Andy Wong/AP

North Korea Accuses U.S. Of Attempting To Assassinate Kim Jong-un ​

The North Korean Ministry of State released a statement accusing South Korea and U.S. intelligence agencies of conspiring to assassinate its Supreme Leader, Kim Jong-un.

A detailed letter released by the ministry says a North Korean citizen by the name of Kim had been bribed $20,000 dollars to commit “state-sponsored terrorism against the supreme leadership...by use of bio-chemical substance” and “bomb terrorism.” This comes as North Korea clamps down on its nuclear program in spite of Donald Trump’s promise to “solve” tensions on the peninsula. North Korea has even dismissed traditional ally China over its nuclear program. To discuss, Worldview talks with Peter Hayes, director of the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability in Berkeley, California.