Nutritional Labels on Beer are About to Make You Feel Guiltier

Beer
In this June 9, 2016, file photo, a shelf is stocked high with hundreds of varieties of single beers at Liquor Mart in Boulder, Colo. The Beer Institute says it is encouraging its members to start displaying more product information on labels, packaging and websites in a push to provide consumers with more details about ingredients, calories and other nutritional facts about their beverages. AP File Photo
Beer
In this June 9, 2016, file photo, a shelf is stocked high with hundreds of varieties of single beers at Liquor Mart in Boulder, Colo. The Beer Institute says it is encouraging its members to start displaying more product information on labels, packaging and websites in a push to provide consumers with more details about ingredients, calories and other nutritional facts about their beverages. AP File Photo

Nutritional Labels on Beer are About to Make You Feel Guiltier

For every beer that sells itself on the small number of calories it has per bottle, there are dozens that outright avoid telling us how many calories they have. This is not due to beer having a particularly high caloric content, though some do. Due to regulations placed at the end of prohibition, alcohol manufacturers in the U.S. have been able to loophole their way out of sharing the nutritional facts on their labels. That is about to change. A new voluntary program from the Beer Institute will lead some of the biggest American brewers to start listing nutritional facts by 2020. Morning Shift talks to Beer Institute CEO Jim McGreevy.