ONE Campaign Combats AIDS Worldwide

This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows a human T cell, in blue, under attack by HIV, in yellow, the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body’s immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. Colors were added by the source. On Thursday, March 7, 2019, researchers reported that monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests.
This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows a human T cell, in blue, under attack by HIV, in yellow, the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body's immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. Colors were added by the source. On Thursday, March 7, 2019, researchers reported that monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests. Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer, Austin Athman / NIH via AP
This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows a human T cell, in blue, under attack by HIV, in yellow, the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body’s immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. Colors were added by the source. On Thursday, March 7, 2019, researchers reported that monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests.
This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows a human T cell, in blue, under attack by HIV, in yellow, the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body's immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. Colors were added by the source. On Thursday, March 7, 2019, researchers reported that monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests. Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer, Austin Athman / NIH via AP

ONE Campaign Combats AIDS Worldwide

Every day, 2,500 people die from AIDS around the world. U2’s Bono founded the ONE Campaign, an international advocacy organization, in part to get that number down to zero. ONE lobbies governments to increase their contributions to the fight against AIDS and other preventable, treatable diseases, particularly in Africa. Last week, ONE came out in support of the U.S. House Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs’ markup of its FY20 appropriations bill, which maintains the United States’ one-third commitment — $1.56 billion — to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, one the largest global health organizations on the planet. A markup is the first step in an appropriations process that will determine funding for projects like the Global Fund. President Trump has indicated a desire to cut foreign aid to the upcoming replenishment of the Global Fund. Gayle Smith, president and CEO of ONE, joins Worldview to talk about the fight against global poverty and preventable diseases like AIDS. She was the administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under President Obama.