One month into hunger strike, Dyett High School activists continue the fight

One month into hunger strike, Dyett High School activists continue the fight
One month into hunger strike, Dyett High School activists continue the fight

One month into hunger strike, Dyett High School activists continue the fight

It's been a month since a hunger strike began over the future of Chicago’s Walter H. Dyett High School in Washington Park. Twelve hunger strikers took up the fight to pressure Chicago Public Schools to reopen Dyett. They wanted it to focus on global leadership and green technology. But when CPS announced earlier this month that Dyett would reopen, what they got was an arts school. And so, the hunger strike continues as parents, grandparents and community members fight for the school and the curriculum they say will best prepare their children for success. Tuesday afternoon on the front lawn of Dyett, a group of about fifteen people sat in a circle on lawn chairs. Cases of bottled water and juice were scattered along the perimeter. People came and went throughout the afternoon, sharing hugs, laughs and conversation. We spoke with some of them about how they're feeling physically after one month without solid food, what their vision for the school would mean for the community and how the Bronzeville-based strike symbolizes struggles for equal-opportunity education across the country. We hear from hunger strikers Jitu Brown, Anna Jones, Irene Robinson, Marc Kaplan, Asif Wilson and Monique Redeaux-Smith. Four of the hunger strikers have ended their liquids-only fast. But five more have joined the effort to replace them. (WBEZ/Lacy Scarmana)