‘Reckoning’ highlights Japanese American redress movement in Chicago

In the 1980s, Japanese Americans successfully fought for reparations. Chicago played a key role in those efforts.

‘Reckoning’ highlights Japanese American redress movement in Chicago
The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians held 20 days of hearings in cities across the country to capture the stories of former Japanese American incarcerees. Hundreds of Japanese Americans from across the Midwest attended the hearings at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. Courtesy of JACL Chicago
‘Reckoning’ highlights Japanese American redress movement in Chicago
The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians held 20 days of hearings in cities across the country to capture the stories of former Japanese American incarcerees. Hundreds of Japanese Americans from across the Midwest attended the hearings at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. Courtesy of JACL Chicago

‘Reckoning’ highlights Japanese American redress movement in Chicago

In the 1980s, Japanese Americans successfully fought for reparations. Chicago played a key role in those efforts.

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, 120,000 people of Japanese descent were forcibly removed from their homes, uprooted from the lives they built and stripped of their civil rights. The aftermath of Japanese American incarceration led to a national movement for reparations.

Reset learns about Reckoning, a new interactive web curriculum about the Japanese American redress movement in Chicago and the lessons their story holds for communities seeking justice and healing today.

GUESTS: Katherine Nagasawa, leader producer of Reckoning and Uprooted

Bill Yoshino, former Midwest regional director for the Japanese American Citizens League

Emma Saito Lincoln, director of the Legacy Center at the Japanese American Service Committee